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Nutrition

Optimal food and nutrient intake play a critical role in disease prevention and health maintenance. With this knowledge, University of Georgia faculty are devoted to learning about and sharing information about nutrition and health programs that benefit lives worldwide.

MISSION

EDUCATION: Students study and research alongside faculty members with expertise in the development of healthy food products, health promotion, disease prevention through diet and obesity.

RESEARCH: Research in the areas of nutrition span from pre-natal care to aging and everything in between. UGA faculty are devoted to learning how nutrition can limit risks of chronic disease and improve lives.

SERVICE: UGA efforts to educate and inform citizens about nutrition guidelines include local programming, online interactive tools and fresh food delivery to citizens living in areas without access to healthy foods.

OPPORTUNITIES

Center for Advanced Ultrastructural Research

CAUR offers services within and outside the university system to biological, biomedical sciences, plant biology, geology, chemistry, textiles, archaeology, agriculture, physics, and nanotechnology/materials analysis.

County Cooperative Extension Offices

Cooperative Extension agents, in county offices across Georgia, provide a link between the University of Georgia and the public. Extension agents also oversee the Georgia 4-H program that provides education and leadership training for youth.

Expanded Foods and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)

The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program is offered through Cooperative Extension and helps parents feed their children healthier meals and snacks, save money on food, and reduce the risk of food-borne illness.

Focus on Diabetes

Diabetes education is the cornerstone of diabetes self-management. The Extension service provides handouts, recipes, lesson plans and curricula that will enhance diabetes control in those affected by the disease.

Live Well Age Well

Live Well Age Well promotes healthy aging and healthy living by focusing on chronic disease prevention and health promotion related to nutrition, physical activity and lifestyle management of older adults.

Rite Bite Diabetes Cooking School

A curriculum developed by the Rite Bite School teaches the meal planning and food preparation skills that will reduce calories, control carbohydrates, modify fats and increase fiber so those affected by diabetes can achieve better blood glucose and blood pressure control.

National Center for Home Food Preservation

The National Center for Home Food Preservation is the source for current research-based recommendations for most methods of home food preservation.

IMPACT

December 2012 | College of Family and Consumer Sciences | Department of Human Development and Family Science

Social support has buffering role on poor diet behaviors, UGA study shows

Older African Americans who are dissatisfied with their lives tend to choose diets high in fat and low in fruits and vegetables. They can improve their health-and eating habits-through social support, according to new research from the University of Georgia.

November 2012 | College of Family and Consumer Sciences, Cooperative Extension |

UGA Cooperative Extension launches Zero Weight Gain Challenge during holidays

University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents are proposing tips to help Georgians keep the pounds off during the holiday season. As part of a new program this year, agents are starting the Zero Weight Gain Challenge, which will include weekly emails about ways to reduce the holiday bulge.

May 2012 | College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences | Department of Food Science

Hazelnuts improve infant formula

Human breast milk is the best source of food for infants. University of Georgia researchers have found what may be a new second best-formula made from hazelnut oil.

March 2012 | Cooperative Extension | Food Preservation

Consumers stretch food dollars, preserve more produce

Whether for health reasons or financial ones, more families are growing and preserving their own food, said a University of Georgia expert.

March 2012 | College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences | Center for Food Safety

Dinner reservations

If one of your New Year’s resolutions is to eat only American-grown food, UGA research reveals that you should mark apple juice, cauliflower, garlic and limes off your grocery list.

March 2012 | College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences | Department of Food Science and Technology

Electrified water packs a powerful punch

Health-conscious consumers know the benefits of eating high-antioxidant foods like fruits, vegetables, beans and nuts. A University of Georgia researcher has uncovered a way to provide antioxidant-rich water in a bottle.

March 2012 | Cooperative Extension | Nutrition and health

Fight chronic disease with healthy cooking, lifestyle

The exact cause of cancer is unknown. But according to UGA research, there are ways to help prevent this deadly disease, including a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle.

April 2012 | College of Family and Consumer Sciences | Department of Foods and Nutrition

Healthy foods missing from stores in low-income black neighborhoods

Most convenience stores have a wide variety of chips, colorful candies and bottles of sugar-sweetened carbonated beverages. While shoppers can buy calorie-heavy foods wrapped in pretty packages in these locations, what they usually can't find are the fresh produce, whole grains and low-fat dairy products necessary for a healthy diet. These stores are the only nearby food source for millions of Americans living in what are called food deserts, because they are isolated from affordable healthy food. In recent studies, University of Georgia foods and nutrition researchers uncovered the unequal distribution of food stores in one Southeast community.

March 2012 | College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences | Department of Food Science and Technology

Hot Java!

Seeing University of Georgia students jump-starting a day with a cup of coffee isn't unusual. However, a professor requiring them to do so is. Professor Shewfelt hopes the course will help students gain a greater appreciation of all foods.

March 2012 | Cooperative Extension | Nutrition and health

How much is too much to gain when eating for two?

UGA research shows that while some weight gain during pregnancy is expected, it varies from person to person - in that the obese should gain less, and an underweight woman should gain more. Moreover, women shouldn't seek to gain weight during pregnancy - instead, they should adhere to a healthy and balanced diet.

March 2012 | Cooperative Extension | Nutrition and health

Mediterranean diets limit disease risk

Mediterranean people eat healthy. Following their culinary tastes may reduce anyone’s risk for diseases, says a University of Georgia expert.

March 2012 | College of Education | Department of Kinesiology

Milk or water still best thirst quenchers

With so many sports drinks, vitamin waters, energy drinks and specialty teas on the market, consumers may wonder which is best for them. An expert with University of Georgia says to be wary of them all and that milk and water are still the best thirst quenchers.

March 2012 | Franklin College of Arts and Sciences | Department of Anthropology

More vegetables, please!

Two University of Georgia scholars argue against the conventional wisdom that the 20th century was a disaster for vegetable crop diversity by showing that there was no overall loss of vegetable diversity in that era.

March 2012 | College of Family and Consumer Sciences | Department of Foods and Nutrition

Need for vitamin supplements among Georgia’s elderly

A new study by University of Georgia researchers shows that despite the availability of fortified foods, many older adults suffer from deficiencies of vitamin D, calcium and B12, which are critical for optimal bone, blood and nervous system health.

March 2012 | Cooperative Extension | Nutrition and health

Obese children need healthier options

More than 30 percent of Georgia’s children are overweight, making it the third worst state in the nation for childhood obesity. A University of Georgia expert says children’s growth cycles are changing, a phenomena setting the stage for long-term obesity.

March 2012 | College of Family and Consumer Sciences | Department of Foods and Nutrition

Spices may protect against consequences of high blood sugar

Herbs and spices are rich in antioxidants, and a new University of Georgia study suggests they are also potent inhibitors of tissue damage and inflammation caused by high levels of blood sugar.

March 2012 | College of Family and Consumer Sciences | Department of Foods and Nutrition

The role of Vitamin D

A University of Georgia nutrition researcher has been awarded a $2.2 million grant to explore the role vitamin D plays in children’s health and the appropriate dose children should take as daily supplements in order to maintain healthy levels of vitamin D in their bloodstream.

March 2012 | Cooperative Extension | Nutrition and health

UGA agents deliver free vegetables to Atlanta ‘food deserts’

University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents in Fulton County are heading up an effort to deliver fresh produce to areas of the county considered “food deserts,” or areas with poor access to affordable, healthy food.

March 2012 | College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences | Department of Food Science and Technology

UGA works to increase pecan awareness, profitability

With a four-year, $1.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, University of Georgia food scientists now have the funding to transform the pecan's image from holiday baking ingredient to year-round powerhouse.

April 2012 | College of Education | Department of Kinesiology

UGA researchers find daily ginger consumption eases muscle pain

For centuries, ginger root has been used as a folk remedy for a variety of ailments such as colds and upset stomachs. But now, researchers at the University of Georgia have found that daily ginger consumption also reduces muscle pain caused by exercise.

April 2012 | Office of the VP of Public Service and Outreach | Archway Partnership

School to serve local produce

Colquitt County Schools are one of three systems chosen to participate in a pilot lunch program aimed at boosting local fruits and vegetables. Finding local produce should not be a problem here in the state’s number one county in terms of vegetable production.